Members Film: Fiction Showcase

Members Film: Fiction Showcase

12th October 2021

Members Film: Faber Fiction Showcase
October 2021
Online
Faber Members will be sent the film by email

Join us to hear world-leading authors read from their work in this fiction showcase event, commissioned by Faber Members. The film will feature introductions and readings from Leïla Slimani, Sarah Hall, Claire Keegan, Helen Oyeyemi, Jo Browning Wroe and Ashley Hickson-Lovence. Members will be sent the film directly to inboxes of the day of release and will enjoy the film for an exclusive priority period of two weeks.

Leïla Slimani reads from The Country of Others
Leïla Slimani is the first Moroccan woman to win France’s most prestigious literary prize, the Prix Goncourt, which she won for Lullaby. A journalist and frequent commentator on women’s and human rights, she is French president Emmanuel Macron’s personal representative for the promotion of the French language and culture. Born in Rabat, Morocco, in 1981, she lives in Paris with her French husband and their two young children.

The Country of Others
Alsace, 1944. Mathilde finds herself falling deeply in love with Amine Belhaj, a Moroccan soldier billeted in her town fighting for the French. After the Liberation, Mathilde leaves her country to follow her new husband to Morocco. But life here is unrecognisable to this brave and passionate young woman.

Suffocated by the heat of the Moroccan climate, by her loneliness on the farm, by the mistrust she inspires as a foreigner and by their lack of money, Mathilde grows restless. As violence broods and Morocco’s own struggle for independence grows daily, Mathilde and Amine’s refusal to take sides sees them and their family at odds with their own desire for freedom. How can Mathilde – a woman whose life is dominated by the decisions of men – hold her family together in a world that is being torn apart?

Sarah Hall reads from Burntcoat

Sarah Hall was born in Cumbria. Twice nominated for the Man Booker Prize, she is the award-winning author of five novels and three short story collections: The Beautiful Indifference, which won the Edge Hill and Portico prizes, Madame Zero, winner of the East Anglian Book Award, and Sudden Traveller, shortlisted for the James Tait Black Prize for Fiction. She is currently the only author to be four times shortlisted for the BBC National Short Story Award, which she won in 2013 with ‘Mrs Fox’ and in 2020 with ‘The Grotesques’.

Burntcoat

You were the last one here before I closed the door of Burntcoat, before we all shut our doors.

The story of two new lovers confined, Burntcoat is a remarkable novel of passion, connection and transformation which no reader will forget. 

In the bedroom above her immense studio at Burntcoat, the celebrated sculptor Edith Harkness is making her final preparations. Her life will draw to an end in the coming days.

Downstairs, the studio is a crucible glowing with memories and desire. It was here, when the first lockdown came, that she brought Halit. The lover she barely knew. A presence from another culture. A doorway into a new and feverish world.

Claire Keegan reads from Small Things Like These
Claire Keegan was brought up on a farm in Ireland. Her stories have won numerous awards and are translated into more than twenty languages. Her short novel Foster was named by The Times as one of the top fifty novels to be published in the twenty-first century. Keegan is now holding the Briena Staunton Fellowship at Pembroke College, Cambridge.

Small Things Like These
It is 1985, in an Irish town. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, Bill Furlong, a coal and timber merchant, faces his busiest season. As he does the rounds, he feels the past rising up to meet him – and encounters the complicit silences of a people controlled by the Church.

The long-awaited new work from the author of Foster, Small Things Like These is an unforgettable story of hope, quiet heroism and tenderness.

Helen Oyeyemi reads from Peaces
Helen Oyeyemi is the author of The Icarus Girl, The Opposite House, White is for Witching (which won the Somerset Maugham Award), Mr Fox, Boy, Snow, Bird, Gingerbread and the short story collection What is Not Yours is Not Yours. In 2013, Helen was included in Granta‘s Best of Young British Novelists.

Peaces
Peaces is the story of Otto and Xavier Shin, a couple who embark on a mysterious train journey that takes them far beyond any destination they could have anticipated. As the carriages roll along they discover each is more curious and fascinating than the last, becoming embroiled in this strange train and its intrigue. Who is Ava Kapoor, the sole full-time inhabitant of the train, and what is her relationship to a man named Prem? Are they passengers or prisoners? We discover who orchestrated the journey, hurtling them all into their past for clues.

This is a brilliant, wise, strange and, above all, beautiful novel.

Jo Browning Wroe reads from A Terrible Kindness
Jo Browning Wroe grew up in a crematorium in Birmingham. She has an MA in Creative Writing from the University of East Anglia and is now Creative Writing Supervisor at Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge. Her debut novel, A Terrible Kindness, was shortlisted for the Bridport Peggy Chapman-Andrews award. 

A Terrible Kindness
Tonight nineteen-year-old William Lavery is dressed for success, his first black-tie do. It’s the Midlands Chapter of the Institute of Embalmers Ladies’ Night Dinner Dance, and William is taking Gloria in her sequined evening gown. He can barely believe his luck.

But as the guests sip their drinks and smoke their post-dinner cigarettes a telegram delivers news of a tragedy. An event so terrible it will shake the nation. It is October 1966 and a landslide at a coal mine has buried a school: Aberfan.

William decides he must act, so he stands and volunteers to attend. It will be his first job, and will be – although he’s yet to know it – a choice that threatens to sacrifice his own happiness. His work that night will force him to think about the little boy he was and the losses he has worked so hard to bury. But compassion can have surprising consequences, because – as William discovers – giving so much to others can sometimes help us heal ourselves.

Ashley Hickson-Lovence reads from Your Show

Ashley Hickson-Lovence was born in London in 1991 and is a former secondary school English teacher. He is currently completing his PhD in Creative and Critical Writing at the University of East Anglia and is a Lecturer of Creative Writing at the Arts University, Bournemouth. In his spare time, using his experience as a football referee himself, he formally observes semi-professional referees for the FA. His debut novel, The 392, was released in April 2019.

Your Show


It’s a double celebration tonight, not that many will care about your special role. You carry the weight of the occasion on your shoulders, take it in your stride. You’ve worked hard to get here, earned these palpitations . . . You, the first black man to referee in the Premiership.’

From Jamaica to Sheffield to the recently formed Premier League, Uri rises through the ranks as a referee, making it to the select group list, the highest level of our national game.

But along the way he is confronted with the tensions and prejudices, old and new, which emerge as his every move is watched, analysed and commented on.Your Show is an extraordinary novel which charts one black man’s pioneering efforts to make it, against the odds, to the very top of his profession and beyond.

Tickets: Free for Faber Members - the film will be emailed to Members in October. Join Faber Members for free at https://www.faber.co.uk/members