The Great Melody

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ISBN 9780571325665 Format Paperback
9780571325665
Paperback
Published 21/05/2015 Length 768 pages
768

About Book

Conor Cruise O'Brien's majestic meditation on the life and writings of Burke was originally published in 1992.

'O'Brien [had] been brooding on Edmund Burke for decades. First he worked on a narrative approach and came to a standstill, he knew not why. Then, in the light of much painful observation of the world and its wickedness, he turned to a thematic treatment, inspired by Yeats's elliptic lines: "American colonies, Ireland, France and India / Harried, and Burke's great melody against it." "It", he decided, was the abuse of power.' Paul Johnson, Independent on Sunday

'The best book about Edmund Burke ever written ... It succeeds in liberating this remarkable, tormented and brilliant man from those confusing and confining details of British high political life ... O'Brien's version of Burke's career is a self-reflective and immensely personal one, but its authenticity penetrates to the core.' Linda Colley, Observer

Conor Cruise O'Brien's majestic meditation on the life and writings of Burke was originally published in 1992. 'O'Brien [had] been brooding on Edmund Burke for decades. First he worked on a narrative approach and came to a standstill, he knew not why. Then, in the light of much painful observation of the world and its wickedness, he turned to a thematic treatment, inspired by Yeats's elliptic lines: "American colonies, Ireland, France and India / Harried, and Burke's great melody against it." "It", he decided, was the abuse of power.' Paul Johnson, Independent on Sunday 'The best book about Edmund Burke ever written ... It succeeds in liberating this remarkable, tormented and brilliant man from those confusing and confining details of British high political life ... O'Brien's version of Burke's career is a self-reflective and immensely personal one, but its authenticity penetrates to the core.' Linda Colley, Observer