The Old Vic

Terry Coleman
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ISBN 9780571311255 Format Hardback
Published 02/10/2014 Length 288 pages

About Book

The Old Vic, one of the world's great theatres, opened in 1818 with rowdy melodrama and continued with Edmund Kean in Richard III howled down by the audience. One impresario, among the first of thirteen to go bankrupt there, fled to Milan and ran La Scala. In 1848 a chorus girl tried to murder the leading lady. In 1870 the Vic became a music hall, then a temperance tavern and, from 1912, under Lilian Baylis, both an opera house and the home of Shakespeare. By the 1930s great actors were happy to go there for a pittance - John Gielgud, Charles Laughton, Peggy Ashcroft, and Laurence Olivier. The Vic considered itself a national theatre in all but name.

After the second world war the Royal Ballet and the English National Opera both sprang from the Vic, and the National Theatre, at last established in 1963 under Olivier, made its first home there. In 1980 the Vic was saved from becoming a bingo hall by a generous Toronto businessman. Since 2004 Kevin Spacey, Hollywood actor and the winner of two Oscars, has led a new company there, and toured the world.

  • About Terry Coleman

    As Arts Correspondent of the Guardian Terry Coleman covered the National Theatre under Olivier and Peter Hall. He then strayed into political journalism, interviewing eight British prime ministers and covering American presidential elections, but in 2005 returned to his old patch and wrote the authorised biography of Laurence Olivier.

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