Chamberlain and the Lost Peace

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ISBN 9780571249046 Format Paperback
9780571249046
Paperback
Published 19/02/2009 Length 272 pages
272

About Book

In this controversial and challenging study based on extensive new work on Chamberlain's papers, John Charmley argues against the commonly held view that Chamberlain's policy of appeasement towards Hitler was naïve and weak. By presenting the conflicting views of Chamberlain, Eden and Churchill from the perspective of the pre-war years, he outs forward the view that Chamberlain, correctly foreseeing the long-term damage the war would do to Britain, was justified in pursuing the chance of peace.

This is the first of three revisionist titles John Charmley wrote challenging the accepted version of British foreign policy in the mid-twentieth century; the other two titles are Churchill: The End of Glory and Churchill's Grand Alliance. All three are being reissued in Faber Finds.

'A concise and spirited defence of Chamberlain.' David Reynolds, Independent

In this controversial and challenging study based on extensive new work on Chamberlain's papers, John Charmley argues against the commonly held view that Chamberlain's policy of appeasement towards Hitler was naïve and weak. By presenting the conflicting views of Chamberlain, Eden and Churchill from the perspective of the pre-war years, he outs forward the view that Chamberlain, correctly foreseeing the long-term damage the war would do to Britain, was justified in pursuing the chance of peace.This is the first of three revisionist titles John Charmley wrote challenging the accepted version of British foreign policy in the mid-twentieth century; the other two titles are Churchill: The End of Glory and Churchill's Grand Alliance. All three are being reissued in Faber Finds. 'A concise and spirited defence of Chamberlain.' David Reynolds, Independent
  • About John Charmley

    John Charmley is a British diplomatic historian and a professor of modern history at the University of East Anglia, where he is head of the school of history. He is the author of eight books, five of which are being reissued in Faber Finds. He is perhaps most famous for his revisionist interpretation of British foreign policy in the mid-twentieth century, dealing with subjects like Appeasement and the Second World War with a degree of iconoclasm.

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