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God's Executioner

God's Executioner

Last 1 in stock
ISBN
9780571218462
Published
04/06/2009
9780571218462
Format
Paperback
Price
£12.99
Paperback
352

About the Book

Cromwell spent only nine months of his eventful life in Ireland, yet he stands accused there of war crimes, religious persecution and ethnic cleansing. In a century of unrelenting, bloody warfare and religious persecution throughout Europe, Cromwell was, in many ways, a product of his times. As commander-in-chief of the army in Ireland, however, the responsibilities for the excesses of the military must be laid firmly at his door, while the harsh nature of the post-war settlement also bears his personal imprint. A warrior of Christ, somewhat like the crusaders of medieval Europe, he acted as God's executioner, convinced throughout the horrors of the legitimacy of his cause, and striving to build a better world for the chosen few.
Cromwell spent only nine months of his eventful life in Ireland, yet he stands accused there of war crimes, religious persecution and ethnic cleansing. In a century of unrelenting, bloody warfare and religious persecution throughout Europe, Cromwell was, in many ways, a product of his times. As commander-in-chief of the army in Ireland, however, the responsibilities for the excesses of the military must be laid firmly at his door, while the harsh nature of the post-war settlement also bears his personal imprint. A warrior of Christ, somewhat like the crusaders of medieval Europe, he acted as God's executioner, convinced throughout the horrors of the legitimacy of his cause, and striving to build a better world for the chosen few.
  • Micheál Ó Siochrú

    Micheál Ó Siochrú is a native of Dublin, lectures in history at Trinity College, Dublin and has written extensively on 17th-century Ireland. His publications include Confederate Ireland 1642-1649: A Constitutional and Political Analysis (Dublin, 1999) and Kingdoms in Crisis: Ireland in the 1640s (Dublin, 2001).