Grammars of Creation

George Steiner
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ISBN 9780571206421 Format N/A
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About Book

Are great works of art, literature and music 'creations' or 'inventions'? Does the mathematician 'invent' or 'discover'? Exploring an often neglected field, this book asks whether the current revolutions in our means of communication and in the biological sciences, may bring with them radical changes in the concept of individual creation and of poetic and philosophical invention. Are we returning to ancient anonymities and collectivities in aesthetic and intellectual experience? Are music and architecture now at the frontier where, as Plato would have it, truth and beauty meet? In Grammars of Creation the eminent critic George Steiner brings his unparalleled acumen and erudition to bear on these and other questions.

'This is a mesmerising book . . . Expressed in prose that is unfailingly apt, luminous and evocative.' Guardian

  • About George Steiner

    Born in Paris in 1929, George Steiner was educated in France, the USA and Britain. After a Rhodes Scholarship to Balliol, he joined the editorial staff of The Economist in 1952. In 1956 he was elected a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. There he wrote Tolstoy or Dostoyevsky (1960) and began The Death of Tragedy (1961). In 1964 he published Anno Domini, a book of three novellas dealing with the aftermath of the Second World War. Language and Silence was published in 1967. His other work includes Proofs and Three Parables, which Faber published in 1992.George Steiner lives in Cambridge, where he has been Extraordinary Fellow of Churchill College since 1969. He has received numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur. He has been awarded the Commandeur dans l'ordre des Arts et des Lettres. In 1994 he became the first Lord Weidenfeld Professor of Comparative Literature at Oxford.

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