Alan Clarke

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ISBN 9780571196098 Format Paperback
9780571196098
Paperback
Published 24/08/1998 Length 272 pages
272

About Book

An unusually brilliant generation of film-makers emerged from British television drama in the 1960-70s - none more formidable than Alan Clarke. Yet Clarke enjoyed only a vague renown among the public, even though some of his most incendiary productions - Scum, The Firm, Made in Britain - attracted great controversy. But he was greatly admired by his fellow professionals: 'He became the best of all of us', Stephen Frears observed after Clarke's untimely death in 1990.

In his work Clarke explored working-class lives and left-wing themes with unflinching directness and humour. He forged alliances with gifted writers and producers, and his facility for encouraging stunning performaces (from Gary Oldman, Tim Roth, Ray Winstone) made him a hero amongst actors. As a man, Clarke's wit, vigour and generosity were legendary. Yet he retained a privacy which made him enigmatic and imbued his work with much of its austere radiance. This volume is a tribute to Clarke, made out of the thoughts and memories of those who worked with him and knew him best, and includes a celebatory essay by eminent critic, David Thomson.

An unusually brilliant generation of film-makers emerged from British television drama in the 1960-70s - none more formidable than Alan Clarke. Yet Clarke enjoyed only a vague renown among the public, even though some of his most incendiary productions - Scum, The Firm, Made in Britain - attracted great controversy. But he was greatly admired by his fellow professionals: 'He became the best of all of us', Stephen Frears observed after Clarke's untimely death in 1990.In his work Clarke explored working-class lives and left-wing themes with unflinching directness and humour. He forged alliances with gifted writers and producers, and his facility for encouraging stunning performaces (from Gary Oldman, Tim Roth, Ray Winstone) made him a hero amongst actors. As a man, Clarke's wit, vigour and generosity were legendary. Yet he retained a privacy which made him enigmatic and imbued his work with much of its austere radiance. This volume is a tribute to Clarke, made out of the thoughts and memories of those who worked with him and knew him best, and includes a celebatory essay by eminent critic, David Thomson.
  • About Richard T. Kelly

    Richard T Kelly is the author of three novels published by Faber and Faber: Crusaders (2008, ‘a magnificent state of the nation epic’ – Financial Times); The Possessions of Doctor Forrest (2011, ‘a horror novel of the most enjoyably reckless stripe’ – TLS); and The Knives (2016, 'the best novel about modern politics I have read in years' – Observer). In 2013 he co-wrote Judith Tebbutt’s memoir of hostage in Somalia, A Long Walk Home, which was a BBC Radio 4 ‘Book of the Week’, a Sunday Times bestseller, and 2013 National Book Awards nominee as Best Autobiography.

    He has also published a number of interview-based books about filmmakers: Alan Clarke (1998), The Name of this Book is Dogme 95 (2000) and the authorised biography Sean Penn: His Life and Times (2004). Keegan & Dalglish, his study of the parallel careers of two legendary footballers, will be published by Simon & Schuster in 2017.

    Eclipse, his first screenplay for television, was broadcast by Channel 4 in 2010. He has also written scripts for film and stage.

    Richard has also worked in publishing as an editor of books at Faber and Faber and at Penguin Random House, and has acted as a consultant to the literary agency Tibor Jones. He is currently Lecturer in English & Creative Writing at the University of Northampton, and a contributing editor to Esquire magazine.
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